Foxglove Cardigan

April 10, 2015



The Foxglove is a flower I associate with my childhood. I grew up, knowing it as 'Vingerhoedskruid', the Dutch word for Foxglove. 'Vingerhoed' is Dutch for thimble, which is a very apt name I think. 

I associate the flower with home, bumblebees and with my mum. My mother is a garden person. When I think about my childhood and my mum, images of her making a mess in our garden spring to mind. She wanted a garden where birds had trees to sit and make nests in, where hedgehogs had woodpiles to crawl under, and where bees and other insects had flowers to feed on. My dad used to joke about our garden and how wild it must have looked to our neighbours' eyes. My mum spend a lot of time in that garden, as did we as children for we had lots of grass to play on and trees to climb in. I made my first modest Treehouse in that garden.


 My mum planted specific flowers to attract bees, especially bumblebees, which she is very fond of. One of those flowers was the foxglove, a flower bumblebees are apparently especially attracted to. From late spring to early autumn these flowers coloured our garden. Incidentally, I was born and grew up in one of the few places in the Netherlands were the wild variety of the foxglove can still be found. Beware though, while these flowers look beautiful, they are also incredibly toxic, and can be fatal when eaten by humans.



When Kate's book arrived at the Treehouse, it was not hard to decide which project to make first. I loved many of the designs, but I thought it fitting to knit this one first. The design asks for 2ply Shetland yarn, which has become one of my favourite yarns to knit with since first trying it. I've used a similar colour scheme, but not exactly the same colours as Kate. I used Jamieson & Smith Jumperweight colour FC55, which from afar is a purple shade but when surveyed from up close it is revealed to be a complex mix with purple, pink, blue and even yellow fibres. I simply love such a complexity of colour. I've shoved my work-in-progress under many a friend's and family-member's eyes to  make sure each of them got to see the explosion of colours up close.


I knitted the sleeves first and then the body, as to save the best for last. While I was knitting the yoke, I noticed that the last row of the chart was different from the pictures of Kate's Cardigan. Incidentally, at the same time someone on Kate's Ravelry forum noticed it as well, and mailed Kate about it. I'm not sure if this is an actual errata, or just something Kate changed her mind about. In accordance with the project photos it should be an entirely white row, instead of a purple and white row. It does not make a huge difference in the yoke, so do whatever you like. I went with the photos and knitted an entirely white row. Other than that I had breezed through the pattern.


Not to long now, and spring will cause foxgloves to colour our gardens, forests and fields again. Can't say I'm looking forward to warm temperatures, having to pack away my woollen jumpers and the accompanying hay fever, but even I can't deny the joys of more daylight and more colour outside. 

Enjoy the weather!

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